Cough with Asthma or Allergy

Many asthmatics cough. As a rule this is caused by the failure of the microscopic cilia of the chest to beat at a normal rate of 16 to 20 beats per second. Especially if there is infection and pus in the nose, the toxin from the infection can act as an irritant If the bronchi are swollen or in spasm, this can affect the tracheobronchial cilia and instead of the normal ciliary action, we cough. For example, the coal miner doesn’t cough. But when he inhales a large piece of coal that is too big for his cilia to handle, he coughs to get rid of it. When the patient has the flu, the cilia are poisoned by the toxins and they fail, then cough takes over. Many studies have shown that clearing the sinus infection can reduce the cough of allergy or asthma. Antibiotics of course are important. Unfortunately the number of drug resistant bacteria is on the increase so other techniques have to be considered. Deep breathing, raising the elbows as you inhale is good. Hot tea with lemon and honey is helpful. Hot compresses applied over the nose, below, and above the eyes are helpful. Medications containing guiafenesin are recommended. Sometimes making a low-pitched sound which penetrates deep behind the eyes can be beneficial. Pulsatile irrigation is especially helpful, since it actually helps the body help itself – it invigorates the nasal and sinus cilia so they can protect the body against irritants and contagions. This method is safe, safer than blowing your nose. There is some evidence that pulsatile nasal irrigation is helpful to restore...

Smog, Kilauea Volcano, and Air Pollution

Whether it is gasses from volcanoes, or fumes from traffic, air pollution is a serious problem. Tragically this health crisis keeps getting worse with more automobiles and industry. Once upon a time if you went to a deserted Pacific Island, there was no problem with polluted air. Now, the winds carry these pollutants even to the distant sunny beaches! Effects of smoke, gasses and Kilauea  Volcano: • Coughing • Decreased mucus secretion • Eye irritation • Sinus congestion • Sore and dry throat • Wheezing There are two problems with polluted air. One is the size of the particles.     Usually these are carbon or of carbon like composition. The tiny ones can be moved out of the lungs by the action of tiny oars called cilia. The larger ones are too big to be handled by the cilia and so they remain in place and cause inflammation and coughing.  When you see the black soot on your skin, you know it is time to grab an N95 filter mask. The second problem is one of chemical composition. Sulphur dioxide – SO2 – is a common product of burning coal. It combines with other products to form dozens of chemicals, one of which is sulphuric acid, a highly caustic acid. It is any wonder that your eyes burn, nose feels sore, and you cough? Where farming consists of burning left over crops to clear the land and put good chemicals into the soil, the problem is worse. Winter time can be worse than summer when the polluted air is held in place by weather conditions. In the killer London...

Allergy? Flu? Sinusitis? How to tell the difference.

How to tell the difference and the best way to treat it… Sniffling, sneezing and wiping your eyes? You might assume you have a cold…but not so fast. These symptoms can also come from the flu or allergies…from something that’s similar to an allergy…and even from something else entirely—sinusitis! Telling these five conditions apart can be tricky—even for doctors and for people who may have developed allergies later in life. But knowing the difference is the key to getting the most effective treatment. To be well, you need to know the difference Marcie had a constant runny nose. She was referred to me for surgery. “No surgery! You have dust and cat allergy.” With medication, she was fine. COLDS Colds are caused by more than 100 different viruses. Your symptoms will depend on the specific virus you are infected with. Telltale signs: In addition to common cold symptoms, such as sneezing, a sore throat, congestion and/or a cough, you may also have a low-grade fever, mild body aches and aching, swollen sinuses. Symptoms usually last a week or two. My favorite cold remedies: Get into bed and rest. If you can, watch a funny movie. Research shows that laughing promotes healing. Also, have chicken soup and decaffeinated green tea with lemon and honey. Chicken soup and green tea have anti-inflammatory properties that help fight infection. If you need help sleeping, try 25 mg to 50 mg of diphenhydramine (Benadryl). For an immune-boosting herbal cough syrup: Mix one-half teaspoon each of cayenne pepper and freshly grated gingerroot…two tablespoons each of honey and apple cider vinegar…and four tablespoons of water. Take...

The Link Between Allergies and Bad Breath

The Link Between Allergies and Bad Breath by Anthony Dailley DDS With spring right around the corner, many people will start experiencing the annoying symptoms of allergies, such as sinus congestion, sneezing, and runny noses. At the Center for Breath Treatment we often see an increase in halitosis conditions being caused by allergy conditions during the Spring and Fall allergy seasons. As the weather becomes warm and windy, symptoms from allergies will only worsen. As if allergies themselves aren’t enough, they also tend to be a contributor to bad breath in people that experience sinus symptoms. Sinus Congestion Sinus congestion and post-nasal drip are especially troublesome because they can be a source of halitosis. When you are congested, it’s difficult to breathe through your nose, causing you to breathe through your mouth more often than normal. Having a dry mouth contributes to changes in the oral bacteria, and the bacteria tends to accumulate because it isn’t getting constantly washed away by saliva. This by itself can result in a halitosis condition. This can get particularly problematic at night, and a dry mouth coupled with morning breath is a recipe for bad breath. Unfortunately, it is also possible that your allergy medication is causing you to have dry mouth, so you should check the side effects of any medication you’re using, whether its prescription or over the counter. Make sure you are using a product that won’t cause bad breath, such as Clear-Ease, which contains natural enzymes that break down mucus and helps reduce congestion. Post Nasal Drip Post-nasal drip is another allergy related culprit of bad breath. This is...

LA Times Article on Fall Allergy Leaves Out What’s Important.

The Oct 12 Los Angeles Times article by Karen Ravn did give an excellent description of why California is “blessed” with so much pollen. She writes: you’ll wind up with a runny or blocked-up nose, red, watery, itchy eyes, and no end of misery. But, I protest, how about some simple pointers on how to escape the runny nose? As long as your are describing the problem, why not give some solutions? For example: Breakfast in Bed. With allergy, your normal thermostat is “off.” Instead of warming up from cold in the regular manner, you sneeze, cough, and hack: this does warm you up, but it starts a cascade that can last all day. When you awake from sleep, your body temperature is low or cool. If you drink hot tea, chicken soup, and some cereal, this warms up you body temperature and you avoid that bad morning cascade. Because of the bad thermostat, you should carry a jacket or windbreaker for going in and out of air conditioning. This can reduce symptoms. Avoid drinking iced drinks. Odors – perfume, lotions, and lipsticks – add to the allergy arithmetic. Without the lipstick your symptoms might be much less. Drive with your windows closed and air conditioning on. Must close bedroom windows at night; running a filter in the closed bedroom in the daytime filters out dust and pollen. Change outside clothing in order to avoid bringing pollen into the house. You can easily diagnose what you are allergic to. Use the various web sites – Weather Channel, Ask.com, and others to see which weed is blooming when your symptoms...

Allergy? Hay Fever? Do the Arithmetic.

Part One: To be free of allergy symptoms, do the numbers. To avoid the fall pollen season symptoms, you need Arithmetic. Allergy to Do number one Allergy is arithmetic. It is the sum of these factors that causes symptoms: Pollen Getting Chilled Extra Dust Spices – peppers, sauces Sneezing hard; blowing the nose hard Exhaustion. Poor sleep Cat exposure Mold Perfumed lipstick; other perfumes and odors Room deoderizers Nine plus one is ten If pollen count is moderate and you don’t use perfumed lipstick, no symptoms. If you add perfumed lipstick, you sneeze. If pollen count is very high, avoiding all the above won’t stop the sneezing. If pollen count is low, adding dust, cat, spices – you get symptoms. This is because hot spicy food by itself causes histamine to be released. The more the pollen, the more the histamine release. That is why you take antihistamines.   Allergy to Do number two: Carry a jacket or windbreaker, Keep warm and dry. When you have allergy, your natural body thermostat doesn’t work well. Instead of warming you when you get chilled by increasing circulation, your allergy thermostat warms you by coughing and sneezing. This does warm you up, but it  starts a cascade of all day sneezing.   Allergy to Do number three: Have breakfast in bed. Your body temperature is cooled when you sleep.  Hot tea, chicken soup and food, take before you get out of bed, warms the body; then when you get out of bed you avoid the morning sneeze and hacking.   Allergy to Do number four: Dust proof your bedroom. Remember arithmetic? Your...